a not-so-comprehensive A-Z of female directors and their highest rated films

In compiling this A-Z of female directors and their films, my measure of their credibility being only their average score from Metacritic's algorithm, problems became manifest: taking the average reception of women's films and summarising it as their critical consensus, as one example. Although this list is intentionally celebratory of women and their art, it… Continue reading a not-so-comprehensive A-Z of female directors and their highest rated films

thelma & louise (1991): redemptive violence, femininity and queering masculine space

[contains spoilers, content warning: rape, sexual violence] This essay weaves together some of the cinematic elements that animate romance, dark comedy, redemptive violence, absurdity, feminism and queer space - tethering them to the centre of the compelling cinematic universe of Thelma & Louise (1991). Callie Khouri's screenplay "I don't remember ever feeling this awake" In writing Thelma… Continue reading thelma & louise (1991): redemptive violence, femininity and queering masculine space

a brief and visual history of the cinematic camera stare

the great train robbery (1903) metropolis (1927) napoleon (1927) steamboat bill jr. (1928) rebecca (1940) lady in the lake (1946) black narcissus (1947) the red shoes (1948) roshomon (1950) rear window (1954) vertigo (1958) the 400 blows (1959) eyes without a face (1960) psycho (1960) the graduate (1967) le samouraï (1967) once upon a time… Continue reading a brief and visual history of the cinematic camera stare

rosemary’s baby (1968): a nightmare of the body

[spoilers and content warning: rape, themes of complications in pregnancy]   Rosemary's Baby (1968) fools us into believing that we are now, fifty years after its production, at a safe distance from its terror. We see a typical young, married couple move into a New York apartment building, into an apartment met with rumours of… Continue reading rosemary’s baby (1968): a nightmare of the body

california belongs to joan didion

For a writer to take ownership of a place, to stake out their position in its liminal spaces, they perpetuate their vision into art and popular culture, and in turn, our collective memory. When we read we are unrelentingly challenged to deconstruct writers' visions and how they shape our perspectives of familiar places. Together, as… Continue reading california belongs to joan didion

poetry as untranslatable: gloria anzaldúa on straddling dual identity

"borders are set up to define the places that are safe and unsafe, to distinguish us from them"The Chicano movement - the extension of Mexican American civil rights movement during the 1940s and 60s - was a movement of working-class Americans born of a cultural and racial 'mixture' across the southern borders of the US,… Continue reading poetry as untranslatable: gloria anzaldúa on straddling dual identity

isolation, conflict and constraint: the coherency of jean rhys’ short stories

20th-century novelist Jean Rhys compels readers with her mesmerising narratives of exile, loneliness and distorting what it means to be a flâneur. As born and raised in Dominica with European ancestry, Rhys' writing speaks closely to her own upbringing and the complexities of her identity, accounts of being isolated and witnessing isolation in others. The… Continue reading isolation, conflict and constraint: the coherency of jean rhys’ short stories