a brief and visual history of the cinematic camera stare

the great train robbery (1903) metropolis (1927) napoleon (1927) steamboat bill jr. (1928) rebecca (1940) lady in the lake (1946) black narcissus (1947) the red shoes (1948) roshomon (1950) rear window (1954) vertigo (1958) the 400 blows (1959) eyes without a face (1960) psycho (1960) the graduate (1967) le samouraï (1967) once upon a time… Continue reading a brief and visual history of the cinematic camera stare

synecdoche, new love: modern couples exhibition review

'Modern Couples presents a different way of looking at Modernism in art, as seen through the artist 'couple', an elastic term encompassing all manner of intimate relationships that the artists themselves grappled with, expanded, embraced or refuted.' - Exhibition Guide Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde is the newest exhibition at the Barbican Centre. Organised… Continue reading synecdoche, new love: modern couples exhibition review

art and the everyday

If money were not object, my nursery would have been fitted with William Morris wallpaper. Strawberry Thief may have been chosen, or perhaps Seaweed or Honeysuckle. I'm sure their scrolling foliage and patterns of blossoming flowers, fruits and wildlife would have fascinated any young child. However, despite these designs not adorning my childhood walls, I… Continue reading art and the everyday

‘a nightmare fairytale etched in neon colour’: suspiria (1977) and its alternative film posters

  An innocent American ballet dancer's excitement at being accepted to a prestigious Berlin dance school turns to terror when she discovers that the institution is a cover for a murderous coven of witches. A nightmare fairytale etched in neon colour, Dario Argento’s witchy shocker Suspiria remains the most famous of all Italian horror movies.… Continue reading ‘a nightmare fairytale etched in neon colour’: suspiria (1977) and its alternative film posters

identifying dialogues between japanese architecture and the rest of the world

Innovative quarterly architectural magazine JA (now rebranded with a focus on urbanism to ja+u (Japan Architecture + Urbanism) explores movements and conversation in Japanese architecture. JA's website describes the periodical: "JA – the Japan Architect – was first published in June 1956 and was the only English language periodical that introduced Japanese architecture to an overseas audience. Since… Continue reading identifying dialogues between japanese architecture and the rest of the world

shoes, animals, demons and music: mysteries of medieval graffiti

In recent years (the last six years or so), the phenomena of medieval graffiti has become a prominent area of discourse for medievalists. Specifically, what graffiti can reveal to us of the largely mysterious epoch and how it can perhaps debunk some of our modernly prescribed myths ('medievalisms') surrounding the period as a whole. Historian… Continue reading shoes, animals, demons and music: mysteries of medieval graffiti

looking on at robert frank’s ‘the americans’

Ed Ruscha writes "[Frank's] achievement could not be imitated in any way, because he had already done it, sewn it up and gone home. What [he] was left with was the vapors of his talent. I had to make my own kind of art. But wow! The Americans!" Robert Frank's 'The Americans', published in 1958, was… Continue reading looking on at robert frank’s ‘the americans’