From film

the art of failing to bite back

Heralded as feminist horror, Teeth (2007) was quick to receive status as a cult classic amongst young women despite its mediocre critical reception. Its narrative follows celibate teenager Dawn (Jess Weixler) as she encounters temptation with boys her age, eventually leading to sex and to the realisation that she is mutated with the mythic condition…

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: the best and worst of Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood follows fictional TV actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo Dicaprio) and his stunt double and closest friend Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt) struggle to adapt to the fast-shifting and declining Golden Age of Hollywood. While the film initially presents their narrative as a vignette, as a kind of deliberate narcissism that…

Tracing the Screen

  While each decade seeks to exercise cinematic innovation, each produces seminal, essential films which exhibit the edification and creativity of filmmaking. Below are three, carefully selected films per decade which best represent the era from which they were produced, thematically and stylistically.     1920s: mobility and modernity   Man With A Movie Camera…

the dizzyingly grotesque fabric of mulholland drive (2001)

Though it presents a familiar devotion to insatiability and a fervency for neo-noir that characterises Lynch’s repertoire, Mulholland Drive is considered by some the apex of his career. Lynch rather consistently produces films which are distinctly hypnotic in their half-conscious, disorientating terrain, yet these qualities are especially refined in Mulholland Drive. Essentially, Mulholland Drive emphatically presents an…